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In Sephardi and Mizrachi traditions, the ufruf is called the Shabbat Chattan, which means the groom's Shabbat.

As of 2001, Orthodox Jews and Jews affiliated with an Orthodox synagogue accounted for approximately 50% of British Jews (150,000), 26.5% of Israeli Jews (1,500,000), Orthodoxy is not one single movement or school of thought.

There is no single rabbinical body to which all rabbis are expected to belong, or any one organization representing member congregations.

Several local Jewish papers, including New York's Jewish Week and Philadelphia's Jewish Exponent have also dropped use of the term.

According to Shammai Engelmayer, spiritual leader of Temple Israel Community Center in Cliffside Park and former executive editor of Jewish Week, this leaves "Orthodox" as "an umbrella term that designates a very widely disparate group of people very loosely tied together by some core beliefs." According to Rabbi David Bar-Hayim, the term "Orthodox Judaism" was coined as a response to the rise of Reform Judaism in early 19th century Germany.

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On various occasions, we also add new features to make your time at Jewish Friend Finder a successful and fun experience.

Either system one in the Orthodox Jewish dating world wishes to use, once they come to the place of their happy engagement, the man and woman who will soon be joined as one may want to know some of the traditions that have to do with their upcoming day.

THE UFRUF One important custom is the ufruf, which is Yiddish for "calling up." The Ufruf refers to the groom being called up for an aliyah, recitation of a blessing over the Torah, in the synagogue.

There are also those who say this is a reference to the verse in Shir Hashirim, the Song of Songs, "I went down into the garden of nuts to see the fruits of the valley, and to see if the vine had blossomed, to see if the pomegranates were in bloom." In many Ashkenazi Orthodox communities, the bride does not attend the aufruf because of the custom for the bride and groom not to see one another for a week before the wedding.

HISTORY OF THE URFUF It is thought that ceremony evolved from an practice in the Beit Ha Mikdash, the Holy Temple, in Jerusalem.